Submission Guidelines



Submit your completed manuscript to: [email protected]


With your email include the following three attachments as Word documents:

1. The completed manuscript devoid of any reference to the author’s name, contact information, affiliation, or biography.

2. A front page that includes the manuscript's title, author(s) name, affiliation(s), and current Email address.

3. A short biography of all authors.


For Dissertations, Qualifying Papers and Thesis that were successfully defended and accepted by their perspective institutions you can submit without separating the front page from the rest.


Requirements


- Submissions may not be considered for publication elsewhere during the review. Make sure your submission has not been previously published, nor is it under consideration by another journal.

• Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication.

• Authors may request one potential Reviewer outside the Editorial Board for all new manuscript submissions.

• Manuscripts must be original, unpublished papers.

• Only one paper can be submitted for publication in a single issue as first author and one paper as co/author.

• The journal uses APA style in referencing (latest version).

• Papers should not exceed 30 pages (including bibliography and attachments), single-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 font.

• No headers or footers.

• Main titles must be centered, bold with 14 font.

• Subtitles can be bold with 12 font.

• Do not underline.

• All articles must have an abstract, and a minimum of 5 keywords. Abstract should not exceed 250 words.

• Please omit any reference to the author(s)' identification within the manuscript.

• Attach a separate page that includes the manuscript's title, author(s) name, affiliation(s), brief biography, and current contact information.

• Each article must contain the following sections:

          Title

          Abstract

          Key Words

          Body (Introduction, Literature Review, Research Methodology, Data Analysis, Discussion)

          Conclusion (Summary and Recommendations)

          References

• The journal has a zero-tolerance policy for plagiarism and it utilizes advanced plagiarism detection software called CrossCheck powered by iThenticate on each submitted paper. If a paper submitted to the journal has been plagiarized in whole or in part, the paper will be rejected and the author(s) will be prohibited from submitting papers in our journals in the future.


Examples of APA Style Referencing


Book

• Geissler, E. M. (1998). Pocket guide to cultural assessment (2nd ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

• de Paula, T. C. M., Lagana, K., & Gonzalez-Ramirez, L. (1996). Mexican Americans. In J. G. Lipson, S. L Dibble, & P. A. Minarik (Eds.), Culture and nursing care: A pocket guide (pp. 203-221). San Francisco: USCF Nursing Press.

• Russians. (1998). In T. L. Gall (Ed.), Worldmark encyclopedia of cultures and daily life (Vol. 4, pp. 332-339). Detroit, MI: Gale Research.


Journal Article

Oguisso, T. (1999). Professional nursing in Brazil. International Nursing Review, 43, 81-94.


Magazine

• Ulrich, T. (1997, September 22). Linking an Amish hereditary disease with cerebral palsy, a pediatrician challenges a dark inheritance. Time, 150, 30-33.

• Ulrich, T. (1997, September 22). Linking an Amish hereditary disease with cerebral palsy, a pediatrician challenges a dark inheritance. Time, 150, 30-33. Retrieved March 1, 2001 from InfoTrac/Expanded Academic ASAP database.


Newspaper

Padilla, H. (2000, June 6). Hugo prohibits custom animal slaughter; the vote will officially close a Hmong slaughterhouse, where animals were sacrificed for religious reasons. Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN), p. 1B.


Online

• Kavanagh, K., Absalom, K., Beil, W., & Schliessmann, L. (1999). Connecting and becoming culturally competent: A Lakota example. Advances in Nursing Science, 21, 9-31. Retrieved March 26, 2001 from ProQuest/Nursing Journals database.

• Outbreak news. (2001, February 23). Weekly Epidemiological Record, 76, 57-64. Retrieved February 28, 2001 from http://www.who.int/wer/pdf/2001/wer7608.

• Padilla, H. (2000, June 6). Hugo prohibits custom animal slaughter; the vote will officially close a Hmong slaughterhouse, where animals were sacrificed for religious reasons. Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN), p. 1B. Retrieved February 28, 2001 from Lexis-Nexis Universe/General News database.

• The Amish, the Mennonites, and the Plain People. (n.d.). Retrieved May 30, 2000 from Pennsylvania Dutch Country Welcome Center Web site:http://www.800padutch.com/amish.shtml

• Russians. (1998). Worldmark encyclopedia of cultures and daily life. Retrieved January 9, 2003 from Discovering Collection database.


ERIC Document

Fredrickson, M. (2000). Parent/child communication in migrant communities. Miami, FL: Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 377 236).


Dissertation

• Crow, G. K. (1988). Toward a theory of therapeutic syncretism: The Southeast Asian experience: A study of the Cambodians' use of traditional and cosmopolitan health systems. (Doctoral dissertation, University of Utah, 1988). Abstract retrieved March 19, 2001 from CINAHL database.

• Crow, G. K. (1988). Toward a theory of therapeutic syncretism: The Southeast Asian experience: A study of the Cambodians' use of traditional and cosmopolitan health systems (Doctoral dissertation, University of Utah, 1988).Dissertation Abstracts International, _49_(08B), 3101. Abstract retrieved March 19, 2001 from First Search/Dissertation Abstracts International database.


Interviews, Emails, Phone Conversations

"Because they do not provide recoverable data, personal communications are not included in the reference list. Cite personal communications in text only. Give the initials as well as the surname of the communicator, and provide as exact a date as possible." (APA Manual, section 3.102) Example: I. M. Certain (personal communication, April 1, 2000).


Presentations, Speeches, Poster Sessions

Like the example above, if they do not provide "recoverable data," these would not be included in the reference list and would be cited in the text only. If, however, something tangible exists (e.g. handouts of PowerPoint slides, an abstract in a conference program, etc.), it might be citable. See the APA Manual, section 4.16 D and F. Here is an example of a poster session:


• Worral, P. S. & Levin, R. (2004, June). Developing a statewide research agenda. Poster session presented at the biannual meeting of the American Nurses Association, Minneapolis, MN.

• Twohy, K. (2004, January 15). Testimony given at Health, Human Services and Corrections Budget Division, St. Cloud, Minnesota.